A banking problem ?

BANK RESTRUCTURING CONSULTANT

A bank in peril is not necessarily doomed ; simple ways out do exist without necessarily calling for public money. The undersigned has successfully carried out and finalized banks and finance companies restructuring missions in Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Algeria, Thaïland and Yemen.

Raymond BIRÉ

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Curriculum vitæ

GENERAL INFORMATION

  • Raymond Biré
  • French citizen

EDUCATION

  • Master business administration (Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Paris, ESCP)
  • Bachelor private law, with Honour, (Paris Law University)
  • Master business law, (Paris Law University)
  • Harvard Business School, Advanced Management Programme

BANKING CRISES AND RESTRUCTURING STRATEGIES

  • A - CURRENT SITUATION

    • 1 - Assessment

      Even in the event of a disastrous financial situation, a bank should not ask, through government authorities, public money for financial support.
      The more so when this state of affairs most than often stems from mistakes made by the banks’ Officers themselves.
      The 2008 banking failure came from an accumulation of toxic assets as well as financial instruments of extravagant complexity; these two categories of commitments not being sufficiently provisioned
      With the implementation of "restructuring banking operations", the bank’s immediate financial needs could be, at least, partially secured.
      In fine, a bank restructuring operation could partially avoid for the taxpayers to pay for errors which are not theirs but mainly those of the bank in jeopardy.

European banking supervision system

  • 1 - ORIGINALLY

    • A - THE EUROPEAN CENTRAL BANK (ECB) had, initially, two functions :

      • To establish banking regulations for the Euro area, their implementation being afterwards controlled by the SSM.
      • Supervision of the 122 most important banks of the area which represented 82% of the Union’s banking assets.
    • B - SINGLE SUPERVISORY MECHANISM (SSM) implemented on March 19, 2013.

      It was a regulatory body in charge of controlling, on a second degree, smaller banks in the Euro Zone; these continued to be supervised, on a first degree, by their respective national authorities.